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UKOUG 2010 Recap - Wednesday

Wednesday I started late, because I skipped the first session to prepare for my second one "Tales from a Parallel Universe: Using 11gR2’s Edition Based Redefinitions". Went also pretty good as well I think, ended nice on time - even, again, with a session chair. And I received some really positive feedback from people like John King and Christian Antognini. Thanks guys!
Then there was a funny debate kind of session between Tony Hasler and Jonathan Lewis about "Does Oracle ignore hints?". In the end it was all about semantics...if you discard bugs, poor or wrong documentation and more or less hidden features and unexpected optimizer processes, Oracle never ignores your hint (which in fact is more a 'directive' than a hint) - otherwise you might say that Oracle actually does  ignore your hint.
After lunch - instead of the good hot lunches we received a school-like lunch bag this time - I chaired my second session : "Edition-Based Redefinition: Testing Live Application Upgrades (Without Actually Being Live)". Because I already was familiar with the subject at hand, there wasn't very much new stuff in there - but I am always curious to see if I missed someting in my own presentation...
The last session of the event I attended was "Still using ratios" by my colleague Piet de Visser. Due to the worst time slot of the week - and the weather -  there were only a few attendees (around 10). The content was good though. He should have the chance to redo that presentation on a better time!
Then the people that didn't left Birmingham (or couldn't) all winded down in All Bar One and O'Neills for some final drinks and talks.
All in all again a good conference qua content and attendees. Always good to catch up with people you only met a couple of times a year during this kind of events. Hope everybody made it back home eventually and already looking forward to the 2011 edition of the conference!
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