Monday, October 03, 2011

OOW2011 - Announcing Oracle`s Big Data Appliance

During the Oracle ACE Director briefing, Mark Townsend, VP Database Product Management, did "State of the Union" on the Oracle database. This post is my report of his talk...
At this moment around 55% of the installed base of the Oracle database is on 11.2. Last year, Oracle made more money from selling more database licenses and more options on existing installations.
Mark mentioned that there are customers with 1,000`s of databases (and even one with 80,000!) - all using different versions of the database, of the operating system, storage etc. This situation is very hard to maintain and to keep up and running. Inn Oracle`s view, consolidation into a "private cloud" is the solution, and therefore Oracle offers Exadata. One (or less) databases are easier to secure, easier to make high available and easier to upgrade. And when you use Oracle software troughout your application stack, why not use Oracle hardware as well? So Oracle is striving towards a "red stack" (i.e. all Oracle).

The latest version of the Oracle database is 11.2.0.3. 11.2.0.4 is planned for somewhere next year. After that, Oracle 12 will replace the "g" with a "c" - for "cloud" of course! - and should be available somewhere next year as well. Oracle 12c is not a subject on this OpenWorld. You can sign up for the beta test, which will start in November.
Last week, the Oracle Database Appliance (ODA) was announced. The ODA comes with standard 24 cores, but you can license per core - completely different from the current licensing where you have to pay for all cores that are available in your hardware. In Oracle`s terminology, an "Appliance" is engineered for simplicity, anything called "Exa-whatever" is engineered for speed. Next to the ODA, Oracle announced this Monday the "Big Data Appliance", using a (new) Oracle NoSQL database (based on the Berkeley DB). This appliance will do massively parallel batch processing with Hadoop. Therefore Oracle will distribute Hadoop (and support it as well). There will be an Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) to get the data from Hadoop into a relational Oracle database. Another new product in this appliance is "Oracle R". "R" is open source replacement for SAS - a statistical tool for data-analysts (like the software used by the female computer wizard in the tv-series Criminal Minds). So the BDA consists of this whole stack (as I understood it). The BDA solution (or framework or architecture) is aimed at processing huge bulks of no-SQL data (key-value pairs), like user clicks on website, phone calls etc, but is good for oldfashioned ETL too!

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