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My Oracle Open World 2006 Schedule

As other bloggers I also publish my OOW2006 schedule. It was hard to choose between 70 parallel sessions, but IMHO I succeeded in planning a nice schedule:

I'll arrive on Friday, so on Saturday I have one day to recover from the jetlag and visit some interesting sites in San Francisco (also plan a schedule for this touristic part of my visit).

Sunday
ODTUG Oracle Developer Suite (Forms and Reports) Special Interest Group Meeting
I am a user of some of the ODTUG mailing lists. I hope to meet a couple of the people I read posts from for a couple of years.
IOUG Oracle Application Express (APEX) Special Interest Group Meeting
There is - sadly - very little about APEX during OOW and I'll plan to visit most of the sessions with APEX in the title.
Build a Dynamic Menu Framework with Oracle Application Express
And this is also one of the APEX-sessions

Monday
Developing PL/SQL Programs, Using Automated Unit Testing
by my English colleague Andrew Clarke - I'm looking forwar to meet him and listen to what he has to tell about this subject.
Database Worst Practices
by Tom Kyte, so always interesting!
Unleashing the Power of Oracle Streams
I planned to visit more sessions about Streams, because I don't know anything about the subject, apart from a short description - and that sounds interesting enough.

Tuesday
Using Oracle Advanced Queues to Facilitate Near-Real-Time Integration
Queues, Streams - I'd like to know more about thta!
Developing Powerful Oracle Business Intelligence Beans in Oracle Forms
I've used Forms for years, but never used BI beans.
Oracle XML Publisher: Enterprise Reporting and Delivery Platform
XML Publisher is antother new feature. As far as I see it, it coulde be the future replacement of Oracle Reports and/or Oracle Discoverer.

And in the evening I'll visit the 2nd Annual Open World Blogger Meetup

Wednesday
Customer Case Study: XML Publisher Live with all the Bells and Whistles
More about XML Publisher
Data Design Reviews: Using Extreme Humiliation to Ensure Quality Data Models
The title sounds so tempting...
Dynamic SQL in a Dynamic World
How dynamic can or should we be?

Thursday
Implementing Oracle Streams Replication
More on Streams..
Test-Driven Development in the World of PL/SQL
by Steven Feuerstein.. I've visited a day long session by Steven last year and this subject was just shortly mentioned then.
Oracle JDeveloper 10g with Oracle ADF Faces and Oracle JHeadstart: Is it Oracle Forms Yet?
Productivity is so important in our business...
Oracle Discoverer Future: Protect, Extend, Integrate
Were is Discoverer heading to...

Friday
One more day to visit the touristic highlights of SF.

Saturday
Flying back...

I'm looking forward to all of this! I've never visited a huge event like this (over 40.000 visitors), - apart form a soccer game or a rock festival....
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